Facebook


After a nine-month pause, Facebook is taking its mobile ad network out for another spin. “We’re running a second test to show Facebook ads off Facebook in mobile ads and on mobile sites. Our goal is to improve the relevancy of the ads people see. Since this is a test, we don’t have additional details to share,” a Facebook representative told TechCrunch.Facebook first launched its mobile ad network in September 2012, but stopped three months later. The company told us at the time that the initial run was a test to see how the network would perform and whether or not people would find the ads relevant.Josh Constine, our Facebook expert, explains that one reason for the pause may have been low margins. Facebook needed to channel its energy into clear money makers like its mobile app install ads and Facebook Exchange. Now that those two programs are up and running, the company can once again focus on fine-tuning its offsite ad network. One way to grow margins and increase the cut Facebook gets from providing the data needed to target ads may be to buy an existing medium-sized mobile ad network. via Facebook Starts Up Its Mobile Ad Network Again, Focuses On Improved Targeting |...

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Facebook is rolling out shared photo albums, as first reported by Mashable. Users can share access to an album with up to 50 contributors, who can each add up to 200 photos.For those of you who aren’t math whizzes, that means shared albums can be as large as 10,000 photos. Previously, albums were limited to 1,000 total photos and users could only add pictures to their own albums.This new feature should be good for user engagement in groups of friends and with larger albums. Facebook has done a good job of focusing its browser-based photo section around albums and larger batches of photos, while leaving Facebook-owned Instagram to dominate single photos. Users can beautify and share quick snaps in time with their friends via Instagram, but for larger life events weddings, graduations, even just cool vacations, they can share much larger batches of photos on Facebook. via Facebook Announces Shared Photo Albums To Boost Group Engagement |...

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This week Facebook’s ban-bot went berserk; Github went down; and all Google services collapsed for a few minutes, taking 40% of the Internet with them. Just another week on the Internet, then. We love our centralized services, until they let us down.Bruce Sterling calls them “the Stacks”: Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft. In his most recent always riveting State of the World conversation, he wrote:In 2012 it made less and less sense to talk about “the Internet,” “the PC business,” “telephones,” “Silicon Valley,” or “the media,” and much more sense to just study Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft. These big five American vertically organized silos are re-making the world in their image.Other proto-Stacks want to join that number. Once upon a time, Twitter was essentially a protocol: then they became aware of “the increasing importance of us providing the core Twitter consumption experience through a consistent set of products and tools.” Meaning they want to be a Stack. Github used to just host git repositories; now it does issue tracking, project management, and more. Call it a specialized business Stack for software development. And Yahoo is either a second-tier Stack or a Stack wannabe, depending on how generous you’re feeling today.They don’t want much, those Stacks. Just your identity, your allegiance, and all of your data. Just to be your sole provider of messaging, media, merchandise, and metadata. Just to take part in as much of your online existence as they possibly can, and maybe to one day mediate your every interaction with the world around you, online or off. via The Internet: We’re Doing It Wrong |...

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Whispering in a riot is how I would describe commenting on a Facebook Page’s feed posts. No matter how thoughtful they are, your words get drowned out. But a combo of new features is fulfilling Facebook’s promise of two-way conversation. Devise a comment that resonates with others, make it a catchy image macro meme, score enough Likes, and your message gets hoisted to the top of the thread. For years, comments on Page posts were utter chaos. A churning sea of disjointed nonsense and inanity. There was no threading. No ranking. Comments just flooded in reverse-chronologically. On popular Pages, comments would come so fast that there was no chance for meaningful discourse, and anything smart you said got buried immediately. I basically never commented on Page posts because there was no point. Finally over the last few months, Facebook wised up. In March it began rolling out comment threading so you could actually reply to specific other comments, Inside Facebook reported. Still there was no way to find the best comments beyond sifting through the haystack. And trust, a good share of admins weren’t putzing around reading their comment reels either. Too much time for too little insight. That means they weren’t hearing the consensus of their fans, or feedback about whether their posts were on the money, erroneous, or in bad taste. They mostly just went by Like count. But then in June Facebook began letting Page admins sort how their comments were displayed. Reels defaulted to showing “Top Comments” at the top, with admins allowed to switch them back to “Recent Activity” first as before. Suddenly, smart, poignant, or funny comments could rise above the din. Click on the comments section of a news feed post and you’ll see those top comments first. Visit a Page’s Timeline and they’re shown below each post automatically. Top Comments Or Recent Activity Still, you needed to have a way with words to get enough Likes for your comment to get bumped to the top. At least until July 18th when Facebook rolled out the option to comment with an uploaded photo. Suddenly, a new call and response communication style came to the social network. The fact is that image memes are punchy and eye-catching. They can rack up Likes a lot faster than text and therefore are more likely to become Top Comments. And while only the Internet savvy will know how to slap an LolCats-style image macro together with tools like Quick Meme, at least some fans’ opinions will be heard. In my favorite format, when you look at a Page’s photo post in the full-screen theater mode, you...

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TweetDeck by Twitter

TweetDeck by Twitter


Posted on Jun 7, 2013

I tried it for the first time tonight and I’m in love! TweetDeck is a popular web app for social media management. Unlike HootSuite, which operates within your Internet browser, TweetDeck can be installed as a separate program on your hard drive as a desktop application. For those who want the flexibility, apps for the iPhone, Android and Chrome browser are also available. With TweetDeck, you can watch your updates stream in real-time when you connect with Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn, Foursquare, Google Buzz and more. Arrange your feeds with customizable columns Focus on what matters with powerful filters Schedule Tweets to suit your audience Monitor and manage unlimited accounts Stay up to date with notification alerts for new Tweets via TweetDeck by...

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